||
Blog Entry 1 --> Our society developed closely with that of Egypt's. However, the rivalry between our two civilizations was inevitable. Both of us were strategically placed along the prosperous Nile River. It was this river that supplied us with many amenities, that also brought conflict between our two prosperous nations. Both of us gained important aspects from the other's society. For instance, Egypt received political and commercial knowledge, along with trades items like gold, ivory, ebony, and precious stones. Our people from Nubia also relied on Egypt as a crucial trading partner for such products as wine and honey. Commerce was our general linking factor. However, the conflict occurred when my people from Nubia wanted to remain independent on Egypt, while still maintaining control of trade down the Nile River. Since Egypt ruled over us from 2000 B.C.E. -1000 B.C.E., tenions are still high.
Blog Entry 2 --> Being from Nubia, we took advantage of the Nile River. Therefore, it was not suprising that my civilization became an extremely prosperous agricultural one, since its start in 2660 B.C.E. The Nile River deposits a large amount of loess soil on its banks. This allowes us to utilize the large amount of fertile soil. However, the way in which we cultivate our land is different from that of Egypt. To reach full agricultural potential, we need to prepare all fields before the seeds were sowed. This is becuase, we do not have as large a floodplain as Egypt. Also, we constantly have to irrigate our crops, which we did by diverting water directly from the Nile.
Blog Entry 3 --> People think that the Egyptians were always more powerful than us. However, we are not just a small civilization that can be pushed around. There was a time when our Kingdom of Kush, with its capital at Kerma was very powerdul. In fact at one point, my kingdom dominated the upper regions of the Nile and threatened parts of Southern Egypt. Also, after we had established the New Kingdom Kush with the capital at Napata, we went on the offensive end. One of our great leaders King Kashta conguered Egypt, starting the Kushite dynasty and naming himself Pharoh. We ruled Egypt in fact from 800 C.E. to 700 C.E. We are not a civilization to be messed with! Unfortunately we completely lost our homeland due to the Aswan High Dam in the 1960's. : (
||
||

The Nubian's (2660 B.C.E. - 1960 C.E.)

nubia.jpg The pyramids of Nubia, located in Northern Africa
http://images.google.com/images?svnum=10&um=1&hl=en&q=Nubians

Friends

Egyptians
Achaemenid Empire
Greek


Technology

Specialization of Labor and efficient changes in the technologies regarding transportation greatly effected our economy.
We also specialize in finding ways to better irrigate our crops with the water from the Nile River.

Culture

Our people wrote in Meroitic texts, which the simple minds of today's society have yet to decipher, even though it is similar to Eqyptian hieroglyphics.
Unlike the Egyptians my people did not mummify their dead, but we did build pyramids to use as tombs.
Our language was heavily influenced by that of the Sudan, and is known as the Meroitic Language.
map_nubia.jpg Area known as Nubia

Religion

Our religion was heavily influenced by both Egypt and the Sudan.
We worshiped the deities of Amon and Osiris.
It was also not uncommon for many of my people to worship different Egyptian cults.
Our most important god is the lion-god Apedemak.
The creator god for my people is Sebiumeker.

Blog

The Wall

Thank you so much for understanding the importance of our great society’s effect on yours, with things such as religion and, writing. However we must disagree with any misconceptions that you are in any way more powerful than we are. The only advantage you have over is that The Nile happens to run north, and therefore you do control our water supply, but otherwise you Nubians aren’t as powerful as you think you are.
~Egyptians~
History Facebook Home
Bibliography
Bentley, Jerry H., and Ziegler Herbert F.. Traditions & Encounters A Global Perspective on the Past. New York: McGraw Hill, 2006.