Young Turks (aka The Ottoman Society for Union and Progress)- Ottoman Empire: 1908 CE - 1918 CE

external image BalkanWarCont.jpg The Young Turks staging a coup d'etat and deposing the Turkish government to establish a constitutional government in 1908.

external image 0bbbbb32.jpg Our first Young Turk congress. We're awesome like that.

external image declinemap.gif Trying to reform this large of an area takes a lot of work.

Friends

Ottomans
Turkey
Islamic Empire


Technology

external image newspapers.gif
Newspapers-
We used our newly established newspaper industries to spread our message of reform throughout the empire.

Culture

Due to Abdul Hamid's despotic reign over our Ottoman society, we needed to take the drastic steps and call for some serious reform throughout our society. Our beliefs are that we called for universal suffrage, equality before the law, freedom of religion, free public education, secularization of the state, and the emancipation of women. Although some of these may seem too unrealistic, these are the demands we set for ourselves to accomplish. We also wanted to keep the Turkish hegemony throughout the whole empire, which isn't an easy task to do. With these ideas for our own social reform we set forth to change the government that had turned so bad.

Religion

Since the Tanzimat spread the legal equality to Jews and Christians, we are not all Muslims, although that is the religion of the majority of us. Still since we are in the land of the Islamic Empires, we are all mostly Muslims and follow the faith of Islam.

Blog

Blog Entry #1:
1876, Ottoman Empire: Abdul Hamid has to be stopped. We cannot let that man have that much control over our Turkish government if he is just going to misuse it and not do anything to help the people and only himself. He thinks he can own us because he was living with the Europeans in his exile of our lands. That doesn't mean anything. We need to establish ourselves as a threat to the ruler and overthrow him for a better government. There has to be a way to do it, even if we have to resort to violence...

Blog Entry #2:
1909, Ottoman Empire: Yes! We did it! We got Abdul Hamid and the rest of the Turkish government to change their ways and adapt the constitution to be better for everybody, not just them. Our ideas aren't way too far out there. We have some compelling issues in or society that we think needs to be addressed, and now after our coup, we have everything we need to voice our opinions. There seems to be a small problem with one thing though, and that is our enforcement of the Turkish language on everyone. I hope this doesn't cause much trouble...

Blog Entry #3:
1918, Ottoman Empire: One thing that we, the people, don't appreciate is this enforcement of the Turkish language. Most of us speak Arabic and Slavic as it is, and we don't want to change that just because this radical group of people wanted to change their society. We did like the ideas that they had to offer, but we will never give up our native tongue. We will have to start fighting back against this group of peoples, although our Ottoman Empire as a whole may suffer for it.

The Wall

How dare you talk to us in that kind of tone. I am certainly ready to talk and I have some important things to tell you. Our empire was far superior to yours and only some roots of our culture comes from the Oghuz Turks(thats you). Most of it however comes from the Persian and Byzantine empires though and as we expand, we incorporate even more cultures to our empire. We do appreciate parts of your culture though. Latah....
--Ottomans--

Yeah Young Turks! Way to be young AND Turkish. Since we're the guys that influenced you into becoming who you are, we're pretty proud of what you guys have done so far. We don't like how you're trying to make a whole Turkish state thing, but other than that you guys have got it nailed. I mean, individual freedoms and local autonomy? Good stuff.

Keep on keeping on,
the Young Ottomans

Bibliography

Bentley, Jerry, H., and Herbert, F. Ziegler. Traditions and Endouncters: A Global Perspective on the Past. New York, NY: McGraw-Hill, 2006.